Voices of the Civil War - The Charles H. Wright Museum Blog - Page 7

Voices of the Civil War Episode 9 "Port Royal Experiment"

OCTOBER 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

In Episode 9, we explore the bounds of citizenship for the newly released slaves on the Sea Islands of South Carolina during the Port Royal Experiment.  If slaves were treated like freedmen, were they not citizens?  And if the privileges of citizenship were extended to refugee slaves, was the Civil War indeed a conflict about slavery?

Credits

1 - 23 Library of Congress
24 North Carolina Collections, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library
25 New York Public Library
27 Library of Congress
28 Oxford University Press
29 Public Domain
30 – 31 Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 8 "Battle of Antietam"

SEPTEMBER 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click on the links below to view prior episodes:

• Episode 1 Part 1 click here
• Episode 1 Part 2 click here
• Episode 2 click here
• Episode 3 click here
• Episode 4 click here
• Episode 5 click here
• Episode 6 click here
• Episode 7 click here

The Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1862, produced the most casualties of any single day in the Civil War. The battle was a draw and neither the Union nor the Confederacy came out ahead. Nevertheless, this battle gave President Lincoln the fuel and momentum to issue one of the most important documents in American History.

Credits

1 - 8 Library of Congress
9 National Park Service, Paintings of Captain James Hope
10 - 22 Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 7 "The Day of the Big Gun Shoot"

AUGUST 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click on the links below to view prior episodes:

• Episode 1 Part 1 click here
• Episode 1 Part 2 click here
• Episode 2 click here
• Episode 3 click here
• Episode 4 click here
• Episode 5 click here

• Episode 6 click here

In episode 7, we visit the Sea Islands of South Carolina, where cotton production flourished during slavery. As the Civil War unfolds, the islands become the site of the Battle of Port Royal on November 7, 1861. Armies attack, slave masters flee, and cotton and slaves remain, once again, left with the dust from where the cannon fire settles. The battle, originally a conflict over Southern seaports, becomes a training ground for future reconstruction and what to do with those enslaved.

Credits

1 Library of Congress
2 Hagley Museum and Library
3-5 Library of Congress
6 Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries
7 Library of Congress
8 House Divided Project, Dickinson College
9 Library of Congress
10 Duke University
11-12 Library of Congress
13 From the collection of Dr. Peter Keim, Austin, Texas
14 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
15 -23 Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 6 "Overwhelming Numbers and Resources"

JULY 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click on the links below to view prior episodes:

• Episode 1 Part 1 click here
• Episode 1 Part 2 click here
• Episode 2 click here
• Episode 3 click here
• Episode 4 click here
• Episode 5 click here

At the time of Civil War, 18.9 million Americans lived in the North versus 8 million Americans in the South. These overwhelming numbers along with other resources had a critical impact upon the course and outcome of the war. Why was the Confederate army, representing territories with less than half the population of the North, confident they could win the Civil War?

Credits

Shot 1 National Portrait Gallery
Shot 2 White House Historical Association
Shots 3 - 4 Library of Congress
Shot 5 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
Shots 6 -7 Library of Congress
Shot 8 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
Shots 9 - 21 Library of Congress

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 5 "A White Man's War"

JUNE 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial.  Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War.  Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click on the links below to view prior episodes:

• Episode 1 Part 1 click here

• Episode 1 Part 2 click here

• Episode 2 click here

• Episode 3 click here

• Episode 4 click here

Many northerners were determined to keep their conflict with the South a ‘white man’s war.’  Whenever recruiting offices were opened, black men offered themselves and were rejected.  Nonetheless, they were confident that the opportunity to serve the Union was a matter of time.[1]  The Lincoln administration, Republican press and even some anti-slavery newspapers stated that the goal of the war was the restoration of the Union, and that the issues of slavery and blacks had nothing to do with the conflict.  Such actions dampened the rising enthusiasm of African Americans for the Union cause. In episode 5 we learn about the first African American men who were prepared to fight in the Civil War.

[1] William Wells Brown, The Negro in the American Rebellion: His Heroism and His Fidelity, (Athens, Ohio: Ohio University Press, 2003), 30.

Credits

Shots 1 - 5 Library of Congress
Shot 6 Courtesy of the South Carolina Senate
Shot 7 John Baptiste LePaon, Lafayette at Yorktown, Easton, Pennsylvania. Lafayette College, Art Collection
Shot 8 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
Shots 9 -10 Library of Congress
Shot 11 Architect of the Capitol
Shot 12 The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore
Shot 13 Library of Congress
Shots 14 -16 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
Shots 17 -18 Library of Congress

 

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