Voices of the Civil War - The Charles H. Wright Museum Blog - Page 6

Voices of the Civil War Episode 14 "Detroit Draft Riot"

MARCH 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

Episode 14 highlights a major riot within Detroit, Michigan, as one of many riots across the country in response to the Enrollment Act of Conscription. Similar to the riot in New York, the Detroit riot was in response to race and class tension surrounding the issues of slavery, draft exemption, and employment. On March 6, 1863 white Detroiters used the trial of William Faulkner as a catalyst to destroy property within black neighborhoods.

Credits

1. Library of Congress
2. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
3 - 6. Library of Congress
7. New York Public Library
8. Bentley Historical Library
9 - 10. Detroit Public Library
11. Detroit Historical Society
12. Philadelphia Print Shop
13 - 14. Library of Congress
15. Detroit Public Library
16. Library of Congress
17. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
18 - 20, 22 - 23. Detroit Public Library

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 13 "54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment"

FEBRUARY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

Just one month after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry unit was formed on February 9th, 1863. This brave regiment fought in many battles under the threat of re-enslavement, no pay, and immense scrutiny. The regiment’s most famous battle at Fort Wagner was later memorialized in the 1989 film, Glory.

Credits

1. Public Domain
2. Clements Library of the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
3, 6, 8 , 14, 16, 18, 19, 21 - 24. Library of Congress
4 - 5.  Moorland-Spingarn Research Center,
6. Howard University
7. Massachusetts Historical Society
9 - 10. National Archives
11. Massachusetts Historical Society
12. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
13. National Archive
15. Kansas State Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply, http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/499
20. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
25. Public Domain
26. State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/154548
28. National Park Service

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 12 "Emancipation Proclamation"

JANUARY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation after issuing a draft version in September 1862.  The Emancipation Proclamation laid the foundation for what would become the 13th Amendment, issued two years later on January 31, 1865.  Consequently, the proclamation marked a point of no return in regards to negiotiations or compromise with the Confederacy.  At nearly two years into the war, Lincoln finally focused on the heart of the issue and confronted the Confederacy where it mattered.  The Confederacy held fast and continued fighting.

Credits

1. U.S. Senate Collection
2. National Archives
3. Library of Congress
4. Wikimedia Commons
5. Library Company of Philadelphia www.librarycompany.org
6. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
7. Library of Congress
8. Smithsonian
9. Library of Congress
10. Library of Congress
11. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
12. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
13. Library of Congress
14. Library of Congress
15. Library of Congress
16. White House Historical Association
17. Library of Congress
18. Library of Congress
19. Library of Congress
20. Library of Congress
21. Library of Congress
22. National Archives
23. National Archives

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 11 "Prelude to the Emancipation Proclamation"

DECEMBER 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On September 22, 1862 President Abraham Lincoln issued the preliminary Emancipation Proclamation after the Union’s win at the Battle of Antietam.  By December 1862, northern morale was declining and many doubted that Lincoln would issue the Emancipation Proclamation as promised on January 1, 1863.

Credits

1. White House Historical Association
2. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
3. Library of Congress
4. Library of Congress
5. National Archives and Records Administration
6. Library of Congress
7. Library of Congress
8. Library of Congress
9. Library of Congress
10. Paul Collins
11. Library of Congress
12. Library of Congress
13. National Archives and Records Administration
14. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
15. Library of Congress
16. Library of Congress
17. Library of Congress
18. Library of Congress
19. Library of Congress
20. Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 10 "Slave Rebellion and Conspiracy"

NOVEMBER 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

As the American Civil War continues panic of slave rebellions spreads throughout the South.  With thousands of enslaved peoples deserting plantations to claim their freedom, slaveholders could no longer convince themselves of the benevolence of slavery.  Many slaveholders became nervous that the presence of the Union blockade along the Gulf Coast would inspire a slave rebellion reminiscent of Nat Turner’s, or worse, the Haitian Revolution.  As battles spread from Missouri to Virginia, white paranoia of slave resistance rises in the lower Mississippi River Valley.

Credits

1 Library of Congress
2 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
3 - 5 Library of Congress
6 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
7 Public Domain
8 - 9 Library of Congress
10 Public Domain
11 - 14 Library of Congress
15 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
16 - 19 Library of Congress
20 National Archives
21 - 25 Library of Congress

 

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