Voices of the Civil War - The Charles H. Wright Museum Blog - Page 5

Voices of the Civil War Episode 19 "Douglass and Lincoln"

AUGUST 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On August 9, 1863, Frederick Douglass met with President Abraham Lincoln to discuss the fair treatment and equal pay of African American soldiers within the Union Army. Although African American soldiers had proven themselves in battle, recruitment declined as black soldiers still faced racial discrimination and prejudice. Douglass expressed three specific grievances directly to President Lincoln and Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, in an effort to improve the treatment of African American soldiers.

Credits

1-3, 6-7, 9-13, 16-20, 23 Library of Congress

4 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

5, 21 National Archives and Records Administration

8, 22 Massachusetts Historical Society

14-15 Wikimedia Commons

Continue reading
3537 Hits

Voices of the Civil War Episode 18 "New York Draft Riot"

JULY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

The New York City Draft Riot, similar to the Detroit Draft Riot, was caused by the exemption clause of the Enrollment Act of Conscription and racial tensions between African Americans and white citizens. On July 13, 1863, rioters gathered outside of the Provost Marshal office, attacking the officers, setting fire to the building, and eventually burning down the entire block. African Americans throughout the city were beaten, tortured, and even killed. The riot ended on July 16, 1863, after 105 people died and at least 11 black men were lynched.

Credits

1, 4-6, 9-10, 12-13, 19, 22. Library of Congress

2. To the Laboring Men of New York, 18 July 1863 (litho)
American School, (19th century)
Gilder Lehrman Collection, New York, USA
The Bridgeman Art Library

3, 7, 8, 14-18, 20-21. General Research & Reference Division
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture,
The New York Public Library
Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations

4124 Hits

Voices of the Civil War Episode 17 "Combahee River Raid"

JUNE 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

In Episode 17, written by James Easley, we look at the events of June 2, 1863, when Union Colonel James Montgomery led the 2nd South Carolina Colored Infantry Regiment and the 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery up the Combahee River, to raid Confederate outposts and rice plantations. Harriet Tubman worked with Colonel Montgomery to plan the raid and scout the Combahee River for mines. The aftermath of this successful raid greatly reduced Confederate supplies, established a Union blockade on the river and freed nearly 700 enslaved men and women.

Credits

1. Kansas Historical Society

2, 3, 6, 7, 9 - 13, 15, 22 - 24. Library of Congress

8. Wikimedia Commons

18. National Archives and Records Administration

4107 Hits

Voices of the Civil War Episode 16 "102nd U.S. Colored Regiment"

MAY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On May 22, 1863, the United States War Department established the Bureau of Colored Troops to organize and handle the enlistment of black troops into the Union Army. Colored infantries were formed all across the country. On May 23, 1864, the First Michigan Colored Volunteer Infantry was re-designated the 102nd Regiment United States Colored Troops. The 102nd fought throughout South Carolina, eastern Georgia, and Florida during the Civil War.

Credits

1, 4. National Archives and Records Administration

2, 3, 5-8, 11, 17, 20. Library of Congress

9. ac03289 Collection of The New-York Historical Society

10, 12. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

13, 14. State Archives of Michigan

15, 16. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

18. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper

21. Reynolds Farley’s website: www.Detroit1701.org

4338 Hits

Voices of the Civil War Episode 15 "Alexander Thomas Augusta"

APRIL 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

Episode 15 focuses on the life and career of Alexander Thomas Augusta, the first of only eight black physicians commissioned into the Union Army. Major Augusta served in the 7th U.S. Colored Troops and later worked as the surgeon-in-chief at the Freedmen’s Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Credits

1. Ohio Historical Society
2, 17. National Archives and Records Administration
3, 7, 9, 12, 13, 16. Library of Congress
4. Army Military History Institute Collection
5, 10. Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, HUA
6. Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division
8. City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 11
11. Oblate Sisters of Providence in Baltimore
14, 18. General Research & Reference Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations
15. Courtesy Anne Straith Jamieson Fonds, Western Archives, Western University
16. Courtesy of Toronto Public Library

5516 Hits
Powered by EasyBlog for Joomla!