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Current & Upcoming Exhibitions

All exhibitions are free with museum admission

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And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture

Permanent Exhibition

This unique, long-term exhibition serves as the central experience of The Wright Museum. The 22,000 square-foot exhibition space contains more than 20 galleries that allow patrons to travel over time and across geographic boundaries. The journey begins in Africa, the cradle of human life.  Witness several ancient and early modern civilizations that evolved on the continent.  Cross the Atlantic Ocean, experience the tragedy of the middle passage and encounter those... Click here to read more »


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Inspiring Minds: African Americans in Science and Technology

Permanent Exhibition

This comprehensive, high-tech exhibition highlights trailblazers, contemporaries and careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. African Americans have contributed to the scientific and engineering output of the United States since the 17th century, and this history is brought to life through interactive computer kiosks, a touchscreen video wall, and hands-on activities and play areas teaching basic engineering concepts. Four disciplines of scientific advancement are explored: Physical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Life Sciences, and Technology & Engineering... Click here to read more »


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Shadow Matter: The Rhythm of Structure – Afro Futurism to Afro Surrealism

January 19 - August 30, 2015

This one-man show features works by New York sculptor and Inkster, Michigan-native M. Scott Johnson. Scott’s education as a sculptor began in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, where he studied traditional and contemporary stone sculpting under master sculptor, national hero and elder statesman of Zimbabwe stone sculpture Nicholas Mukomberanwa (1940 - 2002). Driven to comprehend new relationships between rhythm and line in the African Diaspora, Scott’s work has also been strongly influenced by African American techno music, Ndyuka and Saramaka graphic art forms, Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi, and Makonde sculpture... Click here to read more »


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The Nataki Way: 36th Anniversary of the Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit

November 8, 2014 - October 11, 2015

Carmen and George N'Namdi founded the Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit (NTSD) as a private school in 1978 to honor the memory of their fourteen-month-old daughter, Nataki Talibah N'Namdi, who died in 1974. The names Nataki and Talibah are from central Africa. Nataki (Nah-TAH-kee) means of high birth and Talibah (Tah-LEE-bah) means seeker after knowledge. Thus the school's name is both an important tribute as well as an expression of aspiration... Click here to read more »


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I, Charles H. Wright: My Story

March 10, 2015 - March 10, 2016

This year, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History reaches a milestone in the history of the institution - its 50th anniversary. To celebrate this august achievement the museum presents an exhibition centered around the life of the man who started it: Charles Howard Wright, M.D. (1919-2002). A great physician, an intellectual of incredible insight, and a man of solemn dedication to his community, through words and images, documents and objects, the exhibition summarizes his expansive legacy... Click here to read more »


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Finding Mona Lisa 313

May 29 - September 13, 2015

"Finding Mona Lisa: Urban Students Become Global Scholars" is a program providing travel and cultural development opportunities for Detroit youth. Artist, educator, and entrepreneur Jocelyn Rainey founded the program in 2007 with a maiden voyage to Paris, France, accompanied by 5 students. Since then she has made subsequent journeys all across the world. This exhibition provides a photographic presentation of the travels of Ms. Rainey and her students to five countries: France (2007), Spain (2008), Japan (2009), Egypt (2010), and Costa Rica (2011)... Click here to read more »


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A is for Africa

Ongoing Exhibition

Twenty-six interactive stations make up a three-dimensional "dictionary" designed for children from pre-school through fourth grade in A is for Africa. Organized by the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, this long-term installation introduces young visitors to an array of interesting persons, places, events, ideas, foods and objects important to understanding the histories and cultures of Africa. While focusing on young children, those who are older will certainly find this activity enjoyable... Click here to read more »


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Ring of Genealogy

Ongoing Exhibition

Located on the floor of the Ford Freedom Rotunda, is Genealogy, a work designed by artist Hubert Massey. The creation depicts the struggles of African Americans in this country. Each figure is symbolic of an experience, from slavery to present day violence, the hunger for knowledge, the importance of spirituality and the upward mobility of African Americans. Surrounding this 37-foot floor are bronze nameplates of prominent African Americans in history. Each year new names are added to this Ring of Genealogy... Click here to read more »


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Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge

Ongoing Exhibition

The works of art included in this long-term installation focus on three areas of African American culture and history. The Musicians celebrates everyday people who have exercised their right to interpret the world as they see it through songs and instruments. Dance and Dancers on the other hand, honors those artists who use their bodies as the medium to express non-verbal emotions, themes and ideas. And Freedom Advocates is dedicated to notable African Americans who fought and died to ensure dignity and freedom for themselves and their people... Click here to read more »


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Detroit Performs!

Ongoing Exhibition

The museum is pleased to present Detroit Performs!, a photomontage dedicated to those who gained national and often international prominence in the performing arts. Although a majority of these artists moved here from other regions, especially the south, they claimed Detroit as their own, usually crediting it as the place where they honed their skills. Many of these innovators, John Lee Hooker, Tommy Flanagan and Mattie Moss Clark among them, put unique spins on existing art forms such as blues, jazz and gospel... Click here to read more »

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