Charles H. Wright Museum Logo
Subscribe to feed The Charles H. Wright Museum Blog

Camp Africa Commences: The Wright's Weekly Update July 13 - 19

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Monday, 13 July 2015
in Events & Updates
Hits: 145 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/13/2015 | Akinwande Oluwole “Wole” Soyinka

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Monday, 13 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 13, 1934 Akinwande Oluwole “Wole” Soyinka, writer, poet, playwright and political activist, was born in Abeokuta, Nigeria. Soyinka studied at the University College, Ibadan from 1952 to 1954 and the University of Leeds where he received a first class honours degree in English literature in 1957. Soyinka returned to Nigeria and began to play an active role in Nigerian politics. During the Nigerian Civil War, he was arrested in 1967 and put into solitary confinement for his attempts to broker a peace. While in prison, he wrote poetry on tissue paper which was published in the collection “Poems from Prison” (1969). After the end of the civil war, Soyinka was released from prison after serving 22 months. Soyinka has been a consistent and outspoken critic of Nigerian military dictators and of political tyranny worldwide. He was awarded the 1986 Nobel Prize for Literature, the first African to be so honored, as one “who in a wide cultural perspective and with poetic overtones fashions the drama of existence.” He was designated United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization Goodwill Ambassador for the promotion of African culture, human rights, freedom of expression, media and communications in 1994. Soyinka was professor of comparative literature at the Obafemi Awolowo University from 1975 to 1999. A prolific writer, he has written many plays, collections of poetry, novels, and essays. His most recent book of essays, “Of Africa,” was published in 2012. His memoir, “You Must Set Forth at Dawn,” was published in 2006. Soyinka has received honorary doctorate degrees from Harvard and Princeton Universities. He received the 2014 International Humanist Award.

Hits: 104 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/12/2015 | Barbara Jordan, First African American woman delivers keynote at the Democratic National Convention

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 12 July 2015
in Today in Black History


July 12, 1976 Barbara Charlene Jordan became the first African American woman to deliver the keynote address at the Democratic National Convention. Her speech is considered by many historians to be the best convention keynote speech in modern history. Jordan was born February 21, 1936 in Houston, Texas. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree, magna cum laude, from Texas Southern University in 1956 and her Juris Doctor degree from Boston University in 1959. Jordan was the first Black woman elected to the Texas State Senate in 1966 and served until 1972. That year, she became the first African American woman to be elected to the United States House of Representatives from a southern state. During her time in Congress, she supported the Community Reinvestment Act of 1977 that required financial institutions to lend and make services available to underserved poor and minority communities and the renewal of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. Jordan retired from politics in 1979 and became adjunct professor at the University of Texas. She was inducted into the National Women’s Hall of Fame in 1990 and was awarded the 1992 National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Spingarn Medal. Jordan was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, by President William J. Clinton August 8, 1994 and the United States Military Academy’s Sylvanus Thayer Award in 1995, the second female recipient. Jordan died January 17, 1996. She was the first Black woman to be buried in the Texas State Cemetery in Austin. A statue of Jordan was unveiled at the University of Texas in Austin April 24, 2009 and the United States Postal Service issued a commemorative postage stamp in her honor in 2011. Her biography, “Barbara Jordan: American Hero,” was published in 2000 and a collection of her speeches, “Barbara Jordan: Speaking the Truth with Eloquent Thunder,” was published in 2007. Jordan’s name is enshrined in the Ring of Genealogy at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan.

Hits: 180 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History, 07/11/2015 | Martin Luther King Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Posted by Nikia Washington
Nikia Washington
Nikia Washington is the Marketing & PR Manager at the Charles H. Wright Museum o
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 11 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 11, 1977 Martin Luther King Jr. was posthumously awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, by President Jimmy Carter. King was born January 15, 1929 in Atlanta, Georgia. He entered Morehouse College at 15 and earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in sociology in 1948. He then earned his Bachelor of Divinity degree from Crozer Theological Seminary in 1951 and his Ph. D. from Boston University in 1955. King led the 1955 Montgomery Bus Boycott and helped found the Southern Christian Leadership Conference in 1957, serving as its first president. King was the 1957 recipient of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People Spingarn Medal. On August 28, 1963, King led the March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom and delivered his “I Have a Dream” speech. He became the youngest person to receive the Nobel Peace Prize in 1964 for his work to end segregation and discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means. King was assassinated April 4, 1968 in Memphis, Tennessee. He was posthumously awarded the Congressional Gold Medal in 2004. The United States Postal Service issued a commemorative postage stamp in his honor in 1979. The U. S. Department of Interior designated his boyhood home and several nearby buildings the Martin Luther King, Jr. National Historic Site October 10, 1980. President Ronald W. Reagan signed a bill creating a federal holiday to honor King November 2, 1983 and Martin Luther King Day was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time January 17, 2000. A memorial to King on the National Mall in Washington, D. C. opened October 16, 2011. “The Autobiography of Martin Luther King, Jr.” was published in 1998. King’s name is enshrined in the Ring of Genealogy at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan.

Hits: 7 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/10/2015 | Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr.

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Friday, 10 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 10, 1943 Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr., hall of fame tennis player and civil rights activist, was born in Richmond, Virginia. Ashe became the first Black player selected to the United States Davis Cup team in 1963 and won the 1965 National Collegiate Athletic Association tennis singles title. He earned his Bachelor of Arts degree in business administration from the University of California at Los Angeles in 1966. Ashe won the U. S. Amateur Championship and the U. S. Open in 1968, the only player to ever win both in the same year. He turned professional in 1969 and won the 1970 Australian Open and 1975 Wimbledon. Ashe retired in 1980 and was inducted into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in 1985. Ashe died February 6, 1993. His autobiography, “Days of Grace,” was published immediately following his death. Posthumously, Ashe received many honors, including the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the nation’s highest civilian honor, presented by President William J. Clinton May 5, 1993, a statue on Monument Avenue in Richmond unveiled July 10, 1996, a commemorative postage stamp issued by the United States Postal Service in 2005, and the naming of the ESPN Arthur Ashe Courage Award given to a member of the sports world who best exhibits courage in the face of adversity. The main stadium at the United States Tennis Association National Tennis Center was renamed in his honor. Ashe’s name is enshrined in the Ring of Genealogy at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan. “Arthur Ashe: Tennis and Justice in the Civil Rights Era” was published in 2014.

Hits: 95 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/09/2015 | The Fourteenth Amendment

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 09 July 2015
in Today in Black History

 

July 9, 1868 The Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution was adopted. The amendment provided a broad definition of citizenship, overruling the decision in Dred Scott v. Sanford which held that Black people could not be citizens of the United States. The amendment’s Equal Protection Clause required states to provide equal protection under the law to all people within their jurisdictions. Despite this clause, the Supreme Court in Plessy v. Ferguson ruled that the states could impose segregation as long as they provided similar facilities, the basis for the “separate but equal” doctrine.

Hits: 90 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/08/2015 | The Clotida

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, 08 July 2015
in Today in Black History


July 8, 1860 
The Clotilda, the last known United States slave ship to bring enslaved Africans to the U. S., entered the Mississippi Sound and anchored off Point-of-Pines in Grand Bay, Alabama with 110 African captives. The United States had banned the importation of enslaved people January 1, 1808 but over the next 52 years thousands of enslaved Africans were imported illegally. The Clotilda had traded for the Africans at Ouidah, Dahomey (now Benin) and made the 45 day voyage back to the U. S. One of the enslaved Africans was Oluale Kossola, later named Kossola Cudjo Lewis. Lewis was freed during the Civil War and he and other formerly enslaved Africans formed Africa Town three miles north of Mobile, Alabama in 1866. When Lewis died July 26, 1935, he was the last survivor of the last known slave ship to enter the United States. Africa Town was added to the National Register of Historic Places December 4, 2012. The story of the Clotilda and the enslaved Africans is told in “Dreams of Africa in Alabama: The Slave Ship Clotilda and the Story of the Last Africans Brought to America” (2007). 

Hits: 319 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/07/2015 | Leroy Robert “Satchel” Paige

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 07 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 7, 1906 Leroy Robert “Satchel” Paige, hall of fame baseball player, was born in Mobile, Alabama. Paige was committed at 12 to the Industrial School for Negro Children where he developed his pitching skills. He was signed by the Chattanooga White Sox of the Negro leagues in 1926. In addition to the Negro leagues, Paige pitched in Cuba, Mexico, and the Dominican Republic. He also pitched against many White major league stars during that time, including hall of famers Dizzy Dean, who called him “the pitcher with the greatest stuff I ever saw”, and Joe DiMaggio, who said that he was the best pitcher he had ever faced. During World War II, when many of the best major league players were in the service, Paige was the highest paid athlete in the world. In 1948, at 42, Paige became the oldest player ever to debut in the major leagues where he pitched until 1953. On September 25, 1965, at 59, he pitched three innings of shutout baseball against the Boston Red Sox. He finally quit pitching in 1967. Paige was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1971, the first player from the Negro leagues to be inducted. A made-for-television movie, “Don’t Look Back”, of his life was aired in 1981. Paige died June 8, 1982. The United States Postal Service issued a commemorative postage stamp in his honor in 2000. A statue of Paige was unveiled July 28, 2006 at the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York commemorating the contributions of the Negro leagues to baseball. His biography, “The Life and Times of an American Legend”, was published in 2009. Another biography, “If You Were Only White”, was published in 2012. 
 

Hits: 328 Continue reading
0 votes

23rd Annual Concert of Colors: The Wright's Weekly Update July 6 - 12

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Monday, 06 July 2015
in Events & Updates

Click here
for more info
23rd Annual Concert of Colors Opening Night featuring Mike Ellison
Thursday, July 9 at 7 PM (Doors open at 5 PM)

In what has become a fist-pumping, standing room-only tradition, The Wright kicks off the 23rd annual Concert of Colors with a power-packed performance by MIKE ELLISON presenting "Hard Enough To Smile," a musical journey encompassing hip hop, rock and roll, African rhythms and more! Concert of Colors, a FREE celebration of the many ethnicities and cultures represented by the people of southeast Michigan and the indigenous music of Detroit, continues through July 12 at the Detroit Institute of Arts and Max M. Fisher Music Center. Updates and complete artist and venue information is at concertofcolors.com.

Click here
for more info
Links to Science presented by the Renaissance Chapter of The Links, Incorporated
Saturday, July 11 at 1:30 PM

Links to Science is an exciting new series of FREE children’s workshops designed to explore The Wright Museum’s newest permanent exhibit, "Inspiring Minds: African Americans in Science & Technology." "Inspiring Minds" explores achievements in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics through interactive computer kiosks, a touchscreen video wall, and hands-on activities and play areas. Let members of The Renaissance (MI) Chapter of The Links, Incorporated be your guides to inspiration! Free.

Click here
for more info
Ford Free Second Sunday
Sunday, July 12 from 1 - 5 PM

Bring your family and friends to experience the wonder of The Wright Museum with free admission every second Sunday of the month courtesy of Ford Motor Company! Enjoy the many exhibitions on display as well as engaging programming for the entire family. Free Second Sundays are supported by Ford Motor Company.

Click here
for more info
Don Barden Foundation Interactive Storytime
Sunday, July 12 at 2 PM

Where music, movement, and literacy collide, this interactive story performance will put your kids in the story! Have fun dancing and enjoying storytelling with Yolanda Jack and Michelle McKinney - AND take a free book home afterwards! This Children's Interactive Storytime is made possible by the support of the Don Barden Foundation and General Motors Foundation. Free.

Click here
for more info
Hustle for History Weekly Dance Lessons ($)
Sunday, July 12 at 5 pm
Get your groove on with our weekly hustle lessons, taught by instructor Thomasenia Johnson of Two Left Feet. Free for Members, $7 for non-members. Purchase 5 lessons and receive a complimentary museum membership, making your next 12 months of hustle lessons FREE! Click here to learn more...
To see all upcoming events, please click here!


Current Exhibitions

And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture
The core experience of The Wright Museum, this 22,000 square-foot exhibition takes visitors through time and across geographic boundaries from prehistoric Africa all the way to modern-day Detroit. Throughout, the efforts of everyday men and women who built families, businesses, educational institutions, spiritual traditions, civic organizations and a legacy of freedom and justice are hailed. Click here to learn more...

Inspiring Minds: African Americans in Science & Technology
This high-tech exhibition highlights trailblazers, contemporaries and careers in the STEM fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. African Americans have contributed to the scientific and engineering output of the United States since the 17th century, and this history is brought to life through interactive computer kiosks, a touchscreen video wall, and hands-on activities and play areas. Inspiring Minds introduces individuals from across the spectrum of fields, levels of renown, and from times past and present, with highlights on African American women in science, black aviators, black inventors, medical ethics, and key historical figures such as George Washington Carver. Click here to learn more...

Shadow Matter: The Rhythm of Structure – Afro Futurism to Afro Surrealism
Through August 30, 2015
This one-man show features works by New York sculptor and Inkster, Michigan-native M. Scott Johnson. Scott’s education as a sculptor began in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe, where he studied traditional and contemporary stone sculpting under master sculptor, national hero and elder statesman of Zimbabwe stone sculpture Nicholas Mukomberanwa (1940 - 2002). Scott’s work has also been strongly influenced by African American techno music, Ndyuka and Saramaka graphic art forms, Japanese-American artist Isamu Noguchi, and Makonde sculpture. Click here to read more...


The Nataki Way: 36th Anniversary of the Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit
Through October 11, 2015
Carmen and George N'Namdi founded the Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit (NTSD) in 1978 to honor the memory of their fourteen-month-old daughter, Nataki Talibah N'Namdi, who died in 1974. The names Nataki and Talibah are from central Africa; Nataki (Nah-TAH-kee) means of high birth and Talibah (Tah-LEE-bah) means seeker after knowledge. In 1995, NTSD was chartered as a public school under Central Michigan University. After 36 years of hard work, the NTSD continues to uplift students from diverse backgrounds and help them embody the varying roles each of us must play to improve our world. Click here to learn more...

I, Charles H. Wright: My Story
Through March 6, 2016
This year, the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History reaches a milestone in the history of the institution - its 50th anniversary. To celebrate this august achievement the museum presents an exhibition centered around the life of the man who started it: Charles Howard Wright, M.D. (1919-2002). A great physician, an intellectual of incredible insight, and a man of solemn dedication to his community, through words and images, documents and objects, the exhibition summarizes his expansive legacy. Click here to learn more...

Finding Mona Lisa 313
Through September 13, 2015
"Finding Mona Lisa" is a program providing travel and cultural development opportunities for Detroit youth founded by artist, educator, and entrepreneur Jocelyn Rainey. The late Gilda Snowden observed that the Finding Mona Lisa students are the works of art, with the different places they've traveled being their canvases. The exhibition features large photographs of the students' travels. Click here to learn more...


You May Have Missed...

Reflecting on the Freedman’s Bank Tour with Ambassador Andrew Young at the Charles H. Wright Museum, Detroit

Slate, "Centuries of Violence" by Dr. Kidada E. Williams, Wayne State University


Become a Member Today!

Members of the The Wright Museum enjoy benefits such as:
• Free admission to the museum
• Free guest pass(es)
• Invitations to Members' Only previews
• Free subscription to the quarterly membership newsletter,
The Wright Times

• 10% discount in the museum store
• Special pricing on select museum events
• 20% off meals at Union Street Restaurant

Unless otherwise noted with ($), all events are FREE and open to the public.
HOURS
Monday - Saturday, 9 am - 5 pm
Sunday, 1 - 5 pm

ADMISSION
Adults (13 - 61) $8
Seniors (62 +) & Youth (3 - 12) $5
Free for members & children under 3

Click Here for Current Exhibitions

Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
315 East Warren Avenue
Detroit, Michigan 48201-1443
Click here for a Google Map

General Info - (313) 494-5800
Group Tours and Reservations - (313) 494-5808
Facility Rental - (313) 494-5801

Become A Member | Donate | Museum Brochure

The Wright Museum™

 

Hits: 242
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/06/2015 | Kevin Hart

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Monday, 06 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 6, 1979 Kevin Darnell Hart, comedian, actor and producer, was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Hart began his professional career as a stand-up comic performing in clubs along the East Coast. He made his film debut in “Paper Soldiers” in 2003. Other films in which he has appeared include “The 40 Year Old Virgin” (2005), “Little Flockers” (2010), “Ride Along” (2014), and “Get Hard” (2015). Hart has released three comedy albums, “I’m a Grown Little Man” (2008), “Seriously Funny” (2010), and “Laugh at My Pain” (2011). He co-created the television show “Real Husbands of Hollywood” in 2013 and continues to star in the show. Hart was included on Time magazine’s 2015 list of the 100 Most Influential People in the Word.

Hits: 432 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/05/2015 | Naomi Cornelia Long Madgett

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 05 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 5, 1923 Naomi Cornelia Long Madgett, Poet Laureate of Detroit, was born in Norfolk, Virginia. Madgett began writing at an early age and published her first book of poems, “Songs to a Phantom Nightingale,” at 17. She earned her Bachelor of Arts degree from Virginia State College (now University) in 1945 and her Master of Education degree from Wayne State University in 1955.. Madgett moved to Detroit, Michigan and became a teacher in the Detroit Public School System where she introduced the first course in African American literature.  In 1956, her poem “Midway,” from the book of poetry “One and the Many,” attracted wide attention for its portrayal of Black people’s struggles and victories in a time when racism was prevalent. Madgett became a professor of English at Eastern Michigan University in 1968 and taught there until her retirement in 1984. Other books by Madgett include “Star by Star: Poems” (1965), “Octavia and Other Poems” (1988), “Connected Islands: New and Selected Poems” (2004), and her autobiography “Pilgrim Journey: Autobiography” (2006).  Madgett has received honorary doctorate degrees from Siena Heights University, Loyola University-Chicago, and Michigan State University.  The annual Naomi Long Madgett Poetry Award was established in 1993 to recognize an outstanding book-length manuscript by an African American poet. Madgett was inducted into the Michigan Women’s Hall of Fame in 2002. She is currently senior editor of Lotus Press. 

Hits: 1018 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/04/2015 | Judge Damon Jerome Keith

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 04 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 4, 1922 Damon Jerome Keith, Senior Judge for the United States Court of Appeals for the Sixth District, was born in Detroit, Michigan. Keith earned his Bachelor of Arts degree from West Virginia State College in 1943, his Juris Doctor degree from the Howard University School of Law in 1949, and his Master of Laws degree from Wayne State University Law School in 1956. He was elected co-chair of the Michigan Civil Rights Commission in 1964 and was appointed to the United States District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan by President Lyndon B. Johnson in 1967. Keith was appointed to the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth District by President Jimmy Carter in 1977. One of Keith’s most notable cases was United States v. Sinclair in 1971 where he ruled that U. S. Attorney General John Mitchell had to disclose the transcripts of illegal wiretaps that he had authorized without first obtaining a search warrant. Former law clerks of Keith include former Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm, the first African American woman to gain tenure at Harvard Law School Lani Guinier, and U. S. Circuit Judge for the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals Eric Clay. The Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights at Wayne State University Law School is named in his honor. “Crusader for Justice: Federal Judge Damon J. Keith” was published in 2013. 

Hits: 462 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/03/2015 | “The Hazel Scott Show”

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Friday, 03 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 3, 1950 “The Hazel Scott Show” premiered on the now defunct DuMont Television Network, the first network television series to be hosted by a Black woman. The show was a 15 minute musical that aired on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. It was well received by critics and had decent ratings. However, the show was cancelled in September, 1950 when Scott was accused of being a Communist sympathizer. Scott was born June 11, 1920 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago but raised in New York City. She performed extensively on the piano as a child and received further training at the Julliard School of Music. While still in high school, she hosted her own radio show. Scott starred at the opening of Barney Josephson’s Café Society Uptown in New York City in 1940 and soon her piano pyrotechnics were acclaimed throughout the United States and Europe. She was called the “darling of café society.” Scott made her Broadway debut in 1942 in “Sing Out the News.” She appeared in a number of films, including “I Dood It” (1943), “Broadway Rhythm” (1944), and “Rhapsody in Blue” (1945). She was one of the first Black entertainers to refuse to play before segregated audiences. Albums released by Scott include “Hazel Scott’s Late Show” (1953) and “Relaxed Piano Mood” (1955). Scott died October 2, 1981. Her biography, “Hazel Scott: The Pioneering Journey of a Jazz Pianist, From Café Society to Hollywood to HUAC,” was published in 2008. 

Hits: 259 Continue reading
0 votes

Feel the Beat | Come Dance With Us at Call of the Drum: The Wright's July 2015 eZine

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 02 July 2015
in Events & Updates
Hits: 351 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History, 07/02/2015 | The Civil Rights Act of 1964

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Thursday, 02 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 2, 1964 The Civil Rights Act of 1964 was signed into law by President Lyndon B. Johnson. The act outlawed unequal application of voter registration requirements and racial segregation in schools, at the workplace, and by facilities that served the general public. It invalidated many of the Jim Crow laws in the South. Initial powers of enforcement were weak but they were strengthened in later years. Books that chronicle the times leading up to the passage and the politics involved include “To End All Segregation: The Politics of the Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964” (1990) and “The Civil Rights Act of 1964: The Passage of the Law That Ended Racial Segregation” (1997).

Hits: 617 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 07/01/2015 | The Republic of Rwanda

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Wednesday, 01 July 2015
in Today in Black History

July 1, 1962 The Republic of Rwanda gained its independence from Belgium. Rwanda is located in Central Africa and is bordered by the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the west, Uganda to the north, Tanzania to the east, and Burundi to the south. It is approximately 10,170 square miles in size and the capital and largest city is Kigali. Rwanda has a population of approximately 12,013,000 people with 93% Christian. The official languages are Kinyarwanda, French, and English.

Hits: 284 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History 06/30/2015 | Allensworth

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Tuesday, 30 June 2015
in Today in Black History

June 30, 1908 Allen Allensworth founded the town of Allensworth in the heart of the San Joaquin Valley as an all-Black community. It is the only California town founded, financed, and governed by African Americans. By 1914, the town was reported to be 900 acres of deeded land worth more than $112,500. Over the next couple of decades, the town became a ghost town. Parts of it have been preserved as the Colonel Allensworth State Historical Park which was listed on the National Register of Historic Places February 23, 1972. Allen Allensworth was born enslaved April 7, 1842 in Louisville, Kentucky. He escaped slavery by joining the Union Army during the Civil War. He was ordained a Baptist minister in 1871 and led several churches in Kentucky. He was the only Black delegate from Kentucky to the Republican National Convention in 1880 and 1884. Allensworth was appointed military chaplain to a unit of Buffalo Soldiers in 1886 and by the time he retired in 1906 had reached the rank of lieutenant colonel, the first African American to achieve that rank. After leaving military service, He moved to Los Angeles, California and founded the town of Allensworth. Allensworth died September 14, 1914. Biographies of Allensworth include “Battles and Victories of Allen Allensworth” (1914) and “Out of Darkness: The Story of Allen Allensworth” (1998).

Hits: 333 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History, 06/29/2015 | The Republic of Seychelles

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Monday, 29 June 2015
in Today in Black History

June 29, 1976 The Republic of Seychelles gained its independence from the United Kingdom. Seychelles is a 115 island country in the Indian Ocean approximately 932 miles east of mainland Africa. It is approximately 174 square miles in size and the capital and largest city is Victoria. Seychelles has a population of approximately 84,000 people with 93% Christian. The official languages are French, English, and Seychellois Creole.

Hits: 195 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History, 06/28/2015 | Organization of Afro-American Unity

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Sunday, 28 June 2015
in Today in Black History

June 28, 1964 Malcolm X formed the Organization of Afro-American Unity. Modeled on the Organization of African Unity, the purpose of the OAAU was to fight for the human rights of African Americans and promote cooperation among Africans and Afro-Americans in the United States. In a memo dated July 2, 1964, FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover described the OAAU as a threat to the national security of the United States. After the death of Malcolm X, dwindling membership led to the collapse of the organization.

 

Hits: 113 Continue reading
0 votes

Today in Black History, 06/27/2015 | Crystal Bird Fauset

Posted by The Wright Museum
The Wright Museum
Founded in 1965 and located in the heart of Midtown Detroit’s Cultural Center, t
User is currently offline
on Saturday, 27 June 2015
in Today in Black History

June 27, 1894 Crystal Bird Fauset, the first African American female state legislator in the United States, was born in Princess Anne, Maryland but raised in Boston, Massachusetts. Fauset worked as field secretary for African American girls at the Young Women’s Christian Association from 1918 to 1926. She earned her bachelor’s degree from Teacher’s College, Columbia University in 1931. Also that year, she founded the Colored Women’s Activities Club for the Democratic National Committee and as a result was appointed director of the Women and Professional Project in the Works Progress Administration. She also served on the Federal Housing Advisory Board in 1935. Fauset was elected to the Pennsylvania state legislature in 1938, the first African American female legislator in the country. During her time in the legislature, she focused on improvements in public health, housing the poor, public relief, and women’s rights in the workplace. Fauset resigned from the Pennsylvania legislature in 1940. She was appointed race relations director at the Office of Civil Defense in 1941 and became a member of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s “Black cabinet.” After World War II, Fauset helped found the United Nations Council of Philadelphia which later became the World Affairs Council. She traveled to Africa, India, and the Middle East to support independence leaders during the 1950s. Fauset died March 27, 1965. A Pennsylvania state historical marker was dedicated in her honor in Philadelphia in 1991. 

Hits: 161 Continue reading
0 votes

Comments