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Voices of the Civil War Episode 33: "Women in the Civil War"

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on Wednesday, 22 October 2014
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OCTOBER 2014: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

The stories of Cathay Williams, Mary Bowser, Susie King Taylor, and Sojourner Truth demonstrate that African American women contributed to and aided Civil War efforts in a variety of crucial ways. Often lost, ignored, or simply overlooked in the history of the Civil War, these women’s stories serve as an important reminder of black women’s active roles and experiences during wartime.

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 29: "Equal Pay"

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on Wednesday, 25 June 2014
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JUNE 2014: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On June 15, 1864, Congress finally approved an act to equalize pay amongst all Union soldiers. African American soldiers were now paid $13 per month plus a $3.50 uniform allowance, equal to that of white soldiers. Nevertheless, Congress made a distinction between freed and formerly enslaved soldier in determining retroactive pay. This distinction divided African American regiments and lowered morale.

Credits

1 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

2, 7, 8, 14, 15 Public Domain

3, 6, 9, 11, 12 Library of Congress

4 State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/147904

5 Massachusetts Historical Society

10 GLC07345 Francis H. Fletcher, Letter to Jacob C. Safford, May 28, 1864 (Courtesy of The Gilder Lehrman Institute of American History)

13 Florida Center for Instructional Technology, College of Education, University of South Florida

16 Courtesy of the Ohio Historical Society

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 27 "Battle of Fort Pillow"

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on Friday, 25 April 2014
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April 2014: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On April 12, 1864, Confederate General Nathan Bedford Forrest invaded the Union garrison at Fort Pillow, Tennessee with 1500 Confederate soldiers. Union Major Lionel F. Booth commanded the garrison with an estimated 600 troops. The Battle of Fort Pillow is often referred to as the Fort Pillow Massacre due to the overwhelming Union casualties, and as the Confederate army specifically targeted African American soldiers.

Credits

1, 18 Collection of Julia J. Norrell

2, 3, 5, 9 Library of Congress

4, 7, 11, 15, 16 General Research & Reference Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations

6, 10, 12, 14, 17 Public Domain

8, 13 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 25 "Dr. Rebecca Lee Crumpler"

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on Wednesday, 26 February 2014
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FEBRUARY 2014: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On February 24, 1864, Rebecca Davis Lee Crumpler overcame prejudices and severe constraints to become the first African American woman in the United States to earn a medical degree. During and after the Civil War, she cared for freed African Americans who would otherwise have had no access to medical care.

Credits

1, 7, 16 Sun Oil Company

2 - 3, 5 - 6, 10 - 13 Library of Congress

4, 14 Public Domain

8 Courtesy Pennsylvania Hospital Historic Collections, Philadelphia

9 Army Military History Institute Collection

15 Courtesy of the Trustees of the Boston Public Library/Rare Book

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 23 "Robert Smalls"

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on Thursday, 19 December 2013
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DECEMBER 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

In December 1863, a lifelong slave named Robert Smalls became the first black captain of a United States vessel. From that point onward, he would earn $150 per month, making him one of the war's highest paid black soldiers. But Smalls' most memorable accomplishment came a year earlier, in one of the most audacious acts of the Civil War.

Credits

1, 2, 4 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

3, 8, 10-14 Library of Congress

5, 9 U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph

http://www.history.navy.mil/photos/sh-civil/civsh-p/planter.htm

6 The Planter, Official Records of the Navies, Series 1, Vol. 12.

Courtesy of the Beaufort District Collection, Beaufort County Library

7 Hagley Museum and Library

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 22 "The Gettysburg Address"

Posted by The Wright Museum
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on Wednesday, 20 November 2013
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NOVEMBER 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On November 19, 1863, in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, President Abraham Lincoln gave the Gettysburg Address, just 272 words, lasting 3 minutes. The location of the Gettysburg Address had its own special resonance for African-Americans. Since the eighteenth century, the town of Gettysburg had maintained a small, vibrant African-American community. But during the Battle of Gettysburg, the two armies damaged or destroyed much of the property belonging to African-Americans, and many of the black residents who fled the town did not return. Though no one could mistake the meaning of the "new birth of freedom", the Gettysburg Address remained silent about the fate of African-Americans. The "great task" mentioned by Lincoln was not emancipation, but the preservation of self-government. Though words cannot end a war or bind up a nation's wounds, the Gettysburg Address lives on as perhaps the most significant speech in American history.

Credits

1, 3, 9, 11 National Archives and Records Administration

2, 5, 7-8, 10, 12, 13, 15-20, 24 - 25 Library of Congress

4, 6 Massachusetts Historical Society

14 Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections, Cornell University Library

21, 23 Adams County Historical Society, Gettysburg, PA

22 Courtesy of Special Collections/Musselman Library, Gettysburg College

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 21 "Sojourner Truth"

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on Tuesday, 22 October 2013
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OCTOBER 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

The women's rights movement in America was directly influenced by the work of the abolitionist movement. By 1863, the abolitionist and women's rights advocate Sojourner Truth had spent more than twenty years speaking out against slavery. She was a remarkable case, but the Civil War saw many female heroes. During the war, American women threw themselves into public life with an enthusiasm born out of a sense of duty.

Credits

1, 2, 11 New York Public Library

3-5, 7-8, 12-13, 15-16, 18, 20, 22, 23, 25-27, 29-30 Library of Congress

6 Corbis

9, 17, 28, 31 Public Domain

10 Willard Library

14, 24 Documenting the American South, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Libraries

19 Detroit Public Library

21 Savannah College of Art and Design, Charles White

32 U.S. Army Center of Military History - Army Military History Institute Collection

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 19 "Douglass and Lincoln"

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on Wednesday, 21 August 2013
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AUGUST 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On August 9, 1863, Frederick Douglass met with President Abraham Lincoln to discuss the fair treatment and equal pay of African American soldiers within the Union Army. Although African American soldiers had proven themselves in battle, recruitment declined as black soldiers still faced racial discrimination and prejudice. Douglass expressed three specific grievances directly to President Lincoln and Secretary of War, Edwin M. Stanton, in an effort to improve the treatment of African American soldiers.

Credits

1-3, 6-7, 9-13, 16-20, 23 Library of Congress

4 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

5, 21 National Archives and Records Administration

8, 22 Massachusetts Historical Society

14-15 Wikimedia Commons

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 18 "New York Draft Riot"

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on Saturday, 20 July 2013
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JULY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

The New York City Draft Riot, similar to the Detroit Draft Riot, was caused by the exemption clause of the Enrollment Act of Conscription and racial tensions between African Americans and white citizens. On July 13, 1863, rioters gathered outside of the Provost Marshal office, attacking the officers, setting fire to the building, and eventually burning down the entire block. African Americans throughout the city were beaten, tortured, and even killed. The riot ended on July 16, 1863, after 105 people died and at least 11 black men were lynched.

Credits

1, 4-6, 9-10, 12-13, 19, 22. Library of Congress

2. To the Laboring Men of New York, 18 July 1863 (litho)
American School, (19th century)
Gilder Lehrman Collection, New York, USA
The Bridgeman Art Library

3, 7, 8, 14-18, 20-21. General Research & Reference Division
Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture,
The New York Public Library
Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 17 "Combahee River Raid"

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on Wednesday, 19 June 2013
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JUNE 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

In Episode 17, written by James Easley, we look at the events of June 2, 1863, when Union Colonel James Montgomery led the 2nd South Carolina Colored Infantry Regiment and the 3rd Rhode Island Heavy Artillery up the Combahee River, to raid Confederate outposts and rice plantations. Harriet Tubman worked with Colonel Montgomery to plan the raid and scout the Combahee River for mines. The aftermath of this successful raid greatly reduced Confederate supplies, established a Union blockade on the river and freed nearly 700 enslaved men and women.

Credits

1. Kansas Historical Society

2, 3, 6, 7, 9 - 13, 15, 22 - 24. Library of Congress

8. Wikimedia Commons

18. National Archives and Records Administration

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 16 "102nd U.S. Colored Regiment"

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on Thursday, 23 May 2013
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MAY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On May 22, 1863, the United States War Department established the Bureau of Colored Troops to organize and handle the enlistment of black troops into the Union Army. Colored infantries were formed all across the country. On May 23, 1864, the First Michigan Colored Volunteer Infantry was re-designated the 102nd Regiment United States Colored Troops. The 102nd fought throughout South Carolina, eastern Georgia, and Florida during the Civil War.

Credits

1, 4. National Archives and Records Administration

2, 3, 5-8, 11, 17, 20. Library of Congress

9. ac03289 Collection of The New-York Historical Society

10, 12. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

13, 14. State Archives of Michigan

15, 16. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History

18. Frank Leslie’s Illustrated Newspaper

21. Reynolds Farley’s website: www.Detroit1701.org

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 15 "Alexander Thomas Augusta"

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on Wednesday, 24 April 2013
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APRIL 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

Episode 15 focuses on the life and career of Alexander Thomas Augusta, the first of only eight black physicians commissioned into the Union Army. Major Augusta served in the 7th U.S. Colored Troops and later worked as the surgeon-in-chief at the Freedmen’s Hospital in Washington, D.C.

Credits

1. Ohio Historical Society
2, 17. National Archives and Records Administration
3, 7, 9, 12, 13, 16. Library of Congress
4. Army Military History Institute Collection
5, 10. Moorland-Spingarn Research Center, HUA
6. Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division
8. City of Toronto Archives, Fonds 1498, Item 11
11. Oblate Sisters of Providence in Baltimore
14, 18. General Research & Reference Division, Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture, The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundations
15. Courtesy Anne Straith Jamieson Fonds, Western Archives, Western University
16. Courtesy of Toronto Public Library

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 14 "Detroit Draft Riot"

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on Tuesday, 26 March 2013
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MARCH 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

Episode 14 highlights a major riot within Detroit, Michigan, as one of many riots across the country in response to the Enrollment Act of Conscription. Similar to the riot in New York, the Detroit riot was in response to race and class tension surrounding the issues of slavery, draft exemption, and employment. On March 6, 1863 white Detroiters used the trial of William Faulkner as a catalyst to destroy property within black neighborhoods.

Credits

1. Library of Congress
2. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
3 - 6. Library of Congress
7. New York Public Library
8. Bentley Historical Library
9 - 10. Detroit Public Library
11. Detroit Historical Society
12. Philadelphia Print Shop
13 - 14. Library of Congress
15. Detroit Public Library
16. Library of Congress
17. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
18 - 20, 22 - 23. Detroit Public Library

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 13 "54th Massachusetts Infantry Regiment"

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on Wednesday, 20 February 2013
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FEBRUARY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

Just one month after President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation, the 54th Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry unit was formed on February 9th, 1863. This brave regiment fought in many battles under the threat of re-enslavement, no pay, and immense scrutiny. The regiment’s most famous battle at Fort Wagner was later memorialized in the 1989 film, Glory.

Credits

1. Public Domain
2. Clements Library of the University of Michigan - Ann Arbor
3, 6, 8 , 14, 16, 18, 19, 21 - 24. Library of Congress
4 - 5.  Moorland-Spingarn Research Center,
6. Howard University
7. Massachusetts Historical Society
9 - 10. National Archives
11. Massachusetts Historical Society
12. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
13. National Archive
15. Kansas State Historical Society, Copy and Reuse Restrictions Apply, http://www.kansasmemory.org/item/499
20. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
25. Public Domain
26. State Archives of Florida, Florida Memory, http://floridamemory.com/items/show/154548
28. National Park Service

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 12 "Emancipation Proclamation"

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JANUARY 2013: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

On January 1, 1863, President Abraham Lincoln issued the Emancipation Proclamation after issuing a draft version in September 1862.  The Emancipation Proclamation laid the foundation for what would become the 13th Amendment, issued two years later on January 31, 1865.  Consequently, the proclamation marked a point of no return in regards to negiotiations or compromise with the Confederacy.  At nearly two years into the war, Lincoln finally focused on the heart of the issue and confronted the Confederacy where it mattered.  The Confederacy held fast and continued fighting.

Credits

1. U.S. Senate Collection
2. National Archives
3. Library of Congress
4. Wikimedia Commons
5. Library Company of Philadelphia www.librarycompany.org
6. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
7. Library of Congress
8. Smithsonian
9. Library of Congress
10. Library of Congress
11. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
12. Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
13. Library of Congress
14. Library of Congress
15. Library of Congress
16. White House Historical Association
17. Library of Congress
18. Library of Congress
19. Library of Congress
20. Library of Congress
21. Library of Congress
22. National Archives
23. National Archives

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 10 "Slave Rebellion and Conspiracy"

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on Wednesday, 21 November 2012
in Voices of the Civil War

NOVEMBER 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

As the American Civil War continues panic of slave rebellions spreads throughout the South.  With thousands of enslaved peoples deserting plantations to claim their freedom, slaveholders could no longer convince themselves of the benevolence of slavery.  Many slaveholders became nervous that the presence of the Union blockade along the Gulf Coast would inspire a slave rebellion reminiscent of Nat Turner’s, or worse, the Haitian Revolution.  As battles spread from Missouri to Virginia, white paranoia of slave resistance rises in the lower Mississippi River Valley.

Credits

1 Library of Congress
2 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
3 - 5 Library of Congress
6 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
7 Public Domain
8 - 9 Library of Congress
10 Public Domain
11 - 14 Library of Congress
15 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
16 - 19 Library of Congress
20 National Archives
21 - 25 Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 9 "Port Royal Experiment"

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on Wednesday, 17 October 2012
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OCTOBER 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

In Episode 9, we explore the bounds of citizenship for the newly released slaves on the Sea Islands of South Carolina during the Port Royal Experiment.  If slaves were treated like freedmen, were they not citizens?  And if the privileges of citizenship were extended to refugee slaves, was the Civil War indeed a conflict about slavery?

Credits

1 - 23 Library of Congress
24 North Carolina Collections, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Library
25 New York Public Library
27 Library of Congress
28 Oxford University Press
29 Public Domain
30 – 31 Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 8 "Battle of Antietam"

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on Wednesday, 19 September 2012
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SEPTEMBER 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click on the links below to view prior episodes:

• Episode 1 Part 1 click here
• Episode 1 Part 2 click here
• Episode 2 click here
• Episode 3 click here
• Episode 4 click here
• Episode 5 click here
• Episode 6 click here
• Episode 7 click here

The Battle of Antietam, fought on September 17, 1862, produced the most casualties of any single day in the Civil War. The battle was a draw and neither the Union nor the Confederacy came out ahead. Nevertheless, this battle gave President Lincoln the fuel and momentum to issue one of the most important documents in American History.

Credits

1 - 8 Library of Congress
9 National Park Service, Paintings of Captain James Hope
10 - 22 Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 7 "The Day of the Big Gun Shoot"

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AUGUST 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click on the links below to view prior episodes:

• Episode 1 Part 1 click here
• Episode 1 Part 2 click here
• Episode 2 click here
• Episode 3 click here
• Episode 4 click here
• Episode 5 click here

• Episode 6 click here

In episode 7, we visit the Sea Islands of South Carolina, where cotton production flourished during slavery. As the Civil War unfolds, the islands become the site of the Battle of Port Royal on November 7, 1861. Armies attack, slave masters flee, and cotton and slaves remain, once again, left with the dust from where the cannon fire settles. The battle, originally a conflict over Southern seaports, becomes a training ground for future reconstruction and what to do with those enslaved.

Credits

1 Library of Congress
2 Hagley Museum and Library
3-5 Library of Congress
6 Courtesy of Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library/University of Georgia Libraries
7 Library of Congress
8 House Divided Project, Dickinson College
9 Library of Congress
10 Duke University
11-12 Library of Congress
13 From the collection of Dr. Peter Keim, Austin, Texas
14 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History
15 -23 Library of Congress

 

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 3 "Contrabands"

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on Wednesday, 18 April 2012
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APRIL 2012: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes will cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War.  Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click on the links below to view prior episodes:

• Episode 1 Part 1 click here

• Episode 1 Part 2 click here

• Episode 2 click here

In Episode 3, Contrabands, we look at the flight of African Americans to northern lines to find freedom and fight with the Union Army.  Three enslaved blacks, Frank Baker, Shepard Mallory, and James Townsend, flee to Union lines where General Benjamin Butler coins the term, “Contraband of war,” and begins a new policy known as the Confiscation Act.

Credits

Shot 1 Courtesy of the Casemate Museum
Shot 2 Courtesy of the Hampton History Museum, Hampton, Va. Tiny M. Hutton Collection.
Shot 3 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-DIG-stereo-1s01806]
Shot 4 National Archives and Record Administration
Shot 5 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-DIG-cwpb-04895]
Shot 6 Courtesy of the Casemate Museum
Shot 8 Library of Congress
Shot 9 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-USZC4-4550]
Shot 10 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-USZCN4-251]
Shot 11 Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, Blanche Coggan Collection
Shot 12 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-USZ62-31165]
Shot 13 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-DIG-stereo-1s02759]
Shot 14 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-USZ62-105557]
Shot 15 National Archives and Record Administration
Shot 16 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs, [LC-DIG-ppmsca-08047]
Shot 17 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-USZ62-156]    
Shot 18 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-DIG-stereo-1s02760]
Shot 19 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-USZ62-7816]
Shot 20 Wikipedia
Shot 21 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-DIG-stereo-1s02762]
Shot 22 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-DIG-pga-01760]
Shot 23 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-USZ62-33407]
Shot 24 Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, [LC-DIG-ppmsca-10976]

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