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Black Philanthropy Month Spotlight: Usher Raymond #BPM2014

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August 1st marks the beginning of Black Philanthropy Month 2014 (#BPM2014), a month-long, multimedia campaign designed to inform, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. Founded by the African Women’s Development Fund USA and proclaimed by the United Nations and Congress in August 2011, BPM was created as an annual, global celebration of giving in the U.S. and worldwide. This year’s theme is “Generosity at Home and Around the Globe.” Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for our daily profile of black philanthropists.

Usher Raymond: Singer-Songwriter, Dancer, Philanthropist, Entrepreneur, and Actor

Usher

 

Usher Raymond is the founder of Usher's New Look non-profit organization. Through partnering with businesses and organizations across the nation, Raymond’s non- profit provides mentoring and real-world leadership experience for youth. New Look is on a mission to change young people’s outlook on life through education and involvement through internships. Raymond has supported a number of other charities and foundations throughout his career, including participation in benefit basketball games and performing as part of a Hurricane Katrina relief concert in 2005.  The artist also performed a public service announcement to promote the "Do Something" campaign for civic engagement. Raymond was honored by the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History and Ford Motor Company at the 2010 Ford Freedom Awards, acknowledging his civic accomplishments and work.

 


Photo Credit:  http://www.dailymail.co.uk/home/moslive/article-566775/Time-Usher-40-watches-hes-late.html

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Today in Black History, 8/22/2014

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• August 22, 1791 The African descended enslaved people of Saint Domingue (Haiti) rose in revolt and plunged the colony into a 12 year revolution that freed them from colonization and slavery. One of the most successful leaders of the revolution was Toussaint L’Ouverture. On January 1, 1804 Jean-Jacques Dessalines, the new leader of the revolution, declared the former colony independent and renamed it the Republic of Haiti, the first independent nation in Latin American and the first post-colonial independent Black led nation in the world.

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Voices of the Civil War Episode 31: "The Civil War & the Black Press"

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AUGUST 2014: The Voices of the Civil War is a five-year film series dedicated to celebrating and commemorating the Civil War over the course of the sesquicentennial. Each month, new episodes cover pertinent topics that follow the monthly events and issues as they unfolded for African Americans during the Civil War. Within these episodes there are various primary sources – letters and diaries, newspaper reports, and more - to recount various experiences of blacks during this period. We encourage your feedback and commentary through our Voices of the Civil War web blog.

Click here to visit the Voices of the Civil War blog to see previous episodes.

In August of 1864, Thomas Morris Chester became the first African American war correspondent to work for a major daily newspaper in the United States. He became an eyewitness to fierce battles between the Union and Confederates and reported on the bravery of African American soldiers on the front lines.

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Black Philanthropy Month Spotlight: Oprah Winfrey #BPM2014

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August 1st marks the beginning of Black Philanthropy Month 2014 (#BPM2014), a month-long, multimedia campaign designed to inform, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. Founded by the African Women’s Development Fund USA and proclaimed by the United Nations and Congress in August 2011, BPM was created as an annual, global celebration of giving in the U.S. and worldwide. This year’s theme is “Generosity at Home and Around the Globe.” Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for our daily profile of black philanthropists.

Oprah Winfrey: Media proprietor, Talk Show Host, Actress, Producer, and Philanthropist

Oprah

Oprah Winfrey has been named the wealthiest African-American of the 20th century, as well as the greatest black philanthropist in American history. To date, Oprah has given more than $400 million towards educational causes, including over 400 scholarships to recipients at Morehouse College in Atlanta, Georgia. Her interest and concern for education extends overseas; in 2007, she opened the Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy for Girls in South Africa, which is focused on educating girls grades 8 – 12 who have demonstrated academic excellence and leadership potential. The Academy is designed to train these girls to become decision-makers in society.

Oprah uses her power and influence to gain support for those who are in need. The Angel Network, the Oprah Winfrey Foundation, and The Oprah Winfrey Operating Foundation, all founded by the billionaire, donate millions of dollars a year to many different organizations and non-profits around the world.  

Photo Credit: http://thatnbalotterypick.com/oprah-winfrey-is-interested-in-buying-the-los-angeles-clippers/

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Today in Black History, 8/21/2014

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• August 21, 1831 Nat Turner’s rebellion began in Southampton County, Virginia. Turner was an enslaved Black man who started with a few trusted fellow enslaved men and grew into more than 50 enslaved and free Black men. The rebels traveled from house to house, freeing enslaved people and killing their White owners. The rebellion was suppressed within 48 hours with 55 White men, women and children killed. Turner was captured October 30. On November 5, he was convicted and sentenced to death and was hung November 11, 1831. The state executed 56 other Black men suspected of being involved in the uprising and another 200 Black people, most of whom had nothing to do with the uprising, were beaten, tortured, and murdered by angry White mobs. Also, the Virginia General Assembly passed new laws making it unlawful to teach enslaved or free Black or Mulatto people to read or write and restricting Black people from holding religious meetings without the presence of a licensed White minister. “The Confessions of Nat Turner,” a novel, won the Pulitzer Prize for fiction in 1968 and a film, “Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property,” was released in 2003. Turner’s name is enshrined in the Ring of Genealogy at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit, Michigan.

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Black Philanthropy Month Spotlight: Roy and Maureen Robert #BPM2014

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August 1st marks the beginning of Black Philanthropy Month 2014 (#BPM2014), a month-long, multimedia campaign designed to inform, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. Founded by the African Women’s Development Fund USA and proclaimed by the United Nations and Congress in August 2011, BPM was created as an annual, global celebration of giving in the U.S. and worldwide. This year’s theme is “Generosity at Home and Around the Globe.” Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for our daily profile of black philanthropists.

Maureen and Roy Roberts

Roberts

“It is so critically important for blacks to give and for our kids to see us give,” said Roy Roberts, a retired group vice president of General Motors Co. and previous Detroit Public Schools emergency financial manager.

Roberts and his wife, Maureen, have long had heads and hearts for supporting the progression of the black community, the arts, and the city of Detroit. Members of the National Organization for Black Philanthropists and the Rockefeller Foundation, the Robert’s are established humanitarians, supporting the Detroit Public Schools Foundation, Detroit Institute of Arts (DIA), United Negro College Fund, the Urban League, Boy Scouts of America, Aquinas College, Gleaners Community Food Bank, and a host of local organizations.

“We do it because we think we should,” Roy said. In 2011, the couple funded a gallery named for African-American philanthropist at the DIA through a seven figure gift.

Maureen, a retired nurse, sits on the Board of Trustees for the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. Prior to and throughout her term, the Roberts have hugely supported the museum, replying to all of its appeals and encouraging others to give through individual fundraising efforts. 

Photo Credit: http://mpapublicpolicyreview.blogspot.com/2011_05_01_archive.html

 

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Today in Black History, 8/20/2014

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• August 20, 1619 The first 20 Africans were brought to what would become Jamestown, Virginia aboard a Dutch ship. The Africans were traded for food and supplies as temporary indentured servants in the same way that English White people were owned as laborers in the New World. Their labor arrangement was for a specified period of time after which they were free to live their lives, just as the English laborers were. The permanent enslavement of Africans in America was implemented later.

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Black Philanthropy Month Spotlight: Gail Snowden #BPM2014

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August 1st marks the beginning of Black Philanthropy Month 2014 (#BPM2014), a month-long, multimedia campaign designed to inform, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. Founded by the African Women’s Development Fund USA and proclaimed by the United Nations and Congress in August 2011, BPM was created as an annual, global celebration of giving in the U.S. and worldwide. This year’s theme is “Generosity at Home and Around the Globe.” Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for our daily profile of black philanthropists.

Gail Snowden: Banker, Urban Community Development Leader

Snowden

Snowden is the Chief Executive Officer of Freedom House, an organization that was founded by her parents, aimed at improving the economic and social standing of communities through education and leadership development. Snowden is a veteran of the banking industry, with over 35 years of banking experience, which culminated with her retiring as Executive Vice President for Bank of America. 

Snowden has been nationally recognized as a leader in urban community development.  Even while working in the banking industry, she placed an emphasis on community investment.  Snowden dedicated her personal time to serving the community by working with organizations geared towards improving educational opportunities for inner-city youth.  She has served as Vice President of Administrative Services for The Boston Foundation, a Boston community foundation that is made of over 850 separate charitable funds established by donors, either for the general benefit of the community or for special purposes. Additionally, she has served as Director of Year Up, Inc., an organization which aims to empower urban young adults with the skills, experience, and support to achieve success in higher education and professional careers.

Photo Credit: www.grandcirclefoundation.org

 

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Today in Black History, 8/19/2014

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• August 19, 1791 Benjamin Banneker, a free African American astronomer, surveyor and almanac author, wrote a letter to United States Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson pointing out the hypocrisy of slavery. In the letter he stated, “I apprehend you will embrace every opportunity, to eradicate that train of absurd and false ideas and opinions, which so generally prevails with respect to us; and that your sentiments are concurrent with mine, which are, that one universal Father hath given being to us all; and that he hath not only made us all of one flesh, but that he has also, without partiality, afforded us all the same sensations and endowed us all with the same faculties; and that however variable we may be in society or religion, however diversified in situation or color; we are all of the same family, and stand in the same relation to him.” Jefferson responded to Banneker on August 30 stating, “No body wishes more than I do, to see such proofs as you exhibit, that nature has given to our black brethren talents equal to those of the other colors of men.” The complete correspondence between the two can be found by doing a search on “Benjamin Banneker letter to Thomas Jefferson.”

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Today in Black History, 8/18/2014

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• August 18, 1899 Frank Smith Horne, ophthalmologist, poet and administrator, was born in New York City. Horne earned his Bachelor of Science degree from City College of New York in 1921 and his Doctor of Optometry degree from Northern Illinois College of Ophthalmology and Otology in 1923. In 1932, he earned his Master of Arts degree from the University of Southern California. Horne started writing while in college and his poems were included in the anthologies “Caroling Dusk: An Anthology of Verse by Negro Poets” (1927), “The Poetry of the Negro, 1746-1949” (1949), and “Haverstraw” (1963). From 1927 to 1936, Horne was professor, then dean, and interim president of Fort Valley High and Industrial School (now Fort Valley State College). From 1936 to 1955, he worked for the United States Housing Authority on minority housing issues. During the Franklin D. Roosevelt administration, Horne was a member of the president’s “Black cabinet.” From 1956 to his death September 7, 1974, Horne worked on housing issues in New York City, including assisting in the development of the nation’s first laws against discrimination in public housing.

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Today in Black History, 8/17/2014

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• August 17, 1849 Archibald Henry Grimke, lawyer, journalist, diplomat and community leader, was born enslaved in Charleston, South Carolina. Grimke and his family were freed by their owner at his death. Grimke went on to earn his Bachelor of Arts degree, with honors, and his Master of Arts degree from Lincoln University in 1870 and 1872, respectively. He earned his Bachelor of Laws degree from Harvard University in 1874 and did graduate work at Princeton Theological Seminary before becoming an ordained Presbyterian minister. Grimke served as the American Consul to the Dominican Republic from 1894 to 1898. He served as president of the American Negro Academy from 1903 to 1916 and was a co-founder of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People in 1909. Throughout this period, Grimke published articles and pamphlets concerning Black life and history. In 1916, he testified against segregation before the House Committee on Reform in the Civil Service. In 1919, Grimke was awarded the NAACP Spingarn Medal. Grimke died February 25, 1930. His biography, “Archibald Grimke: portrait of a black independent,” was published in 1993.

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TAKE THE WHEEL WITH LINCOLN: BOB MAXEY DEALERSHIP AND LOCAL COMMUNITY TO RAISE AS MUCH AS $6,000 FOR THE CHARLES H. WRIGHT MUSEUM

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-Exciting test-drive fundraising event will generate much-needed money for the world’s largest museum dedicated to African American History, helping the local & national community.


lincoln logo

 

Lincoln and its dealers have launched a new program called Driven To Give, combining the successful Drive Smart For Your School and Drive Smart For A Cause programs. Driven To Give is designed to help raise much needed funding for local community groups and nonprofit organizations. To date, Lincoln dealerships and local communities across the United States have helped raised more than $3 million for educational or charitable organizations.

 

Bob Maxey Lincoln is bringing Lincoln’s Driven To Give program to the Detroit community in an effort to raise up to $6,000 for the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History. For every person who takes the wheel and test-drives an eligible Lincoln vehicle at the Charles H. Wright Museum’s African World Festival on Saturday, August 16, 2014, Bob Maxey Lincoln and Lincoln will donate $30 to the museum. The funds will go towards educational and youth programming. Participants who do not wish to test drive the vehicle, but who possess a valid driver’s license and wish to register on site will also earn a $30 donation towards the museum.

“We know funding for community programs is hard to come by, and we want to do our part to help make sure these programs remain available,” said Marty Rutkowski, Sales Manager at Bob Maxey Lincoln. “We’re excited to raise money for the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History.”

The event, which will be held from 10 am to 6 pm, will feature vehicles from the reimagined 2013 Lincoln lineup. Dealership staff on site will be able to assist with all Lincoln vehicles and provide additional information about each vehicle available for test-drive.

To participate in this exciting event and get behind the wheel of your favorite Lincoln vehicle, please visit the African World Festival between 10 am and 6 pm on Saturday, August 16, 2014.

Participants must be 18 or older and have a valid driver’s license. There is a limit of one test-drive per household. All test-drives will last approximately 7-10 minutes.


Hashtag your test drive with: #LincolnContest #ad #DTGSigmas


Lincoln

About Lincoln

Lincoln is the luxury automotive brand of Ford Motor Company, committed to creating compelling vehicles with an exceptional ownership experience to match. Lincoln will introduce four all-new vehicles in the next four years. For more information about Lincoln, please visit media.lincoln.com or www.lincoln.com. Follow us on Facebook at facebook.com/lincoln.

African World Festival at The Wright Museum #AWF14 www.awfDetroit.com


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Today in Black History, 8/16/2014

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• August 16, 1893 Charles Lewis Reason, mathematician, educator and civil rights activist, died. Reason was born July 21, 1818 in New York City. A mathematics child prodigy, Reason began teaching the subject at fourteen at the African Free School. He later studied at McGrawville College. In 1847, Reason co-founded the Society for the Promotion of Education among Colored Children, an organization authorized by the state legislature to oversee Black schools in New York City. In 1849, he was appointed professor of fine writing, Greek, Latin, and French and adjunct professor of mathematics at New York Central College, the first African American professor at a predominantly White college. Reason left that position in 1852 to become principal of the Institute for Colored Youth (now Cheney University), a post he held until 1855. That year, he returned to New York City where he served as a teacher and administrator in the public school system until his retirement in 1892. Reason was committed to the antislavery cause and worked for improvements in Black civil rights. He founded the New York Political Improvement Association which won the right for a jury trial for previously enslaved fugitives in the state. He also headed the successful 1873 effort to outlaw segregation in New York schools.

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Black Philanthropy Month Spotlight: Eddie C. Brown #BPM2014

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August 1st marks the beginning of Black Philanthropy Month 2014 (#BPM2014), a month-long, multimedia campaign designed to inform, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. Founded by the African Women’s Development Fund USA and proclaimed by the United Nations and Congress in August 2011, BPM was created as an annual, global celebration of giving in the U.S. and worldwide. This year’s theme is “Generosity at Home and Around the Globe.” Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for our daily profile of black philanthropists.

Eddie C. Brown: Investment Manager, Entrepreneur, and Philanthropist.

EddieBrown

Eddie Carl Brown is the founder and president of Brown Capital Management, a multi-billion dollar Baltimore-based firm.  Brown is widely recognized for his investment management strategies and his expertise in stock-picking.  Brown and his wife have donated millions of dollars to numerous charities through their established Eddie C. and C. Sylvia Brown Family Foundation.  One of the Brown Family Foundation’s goals has been to provide support for programs geared towards improving health care, education, and social issues in inner-city Baltimore, MD.  Brown has received a number of awards and recognition, most of which include his wife, Sylvia, also being recognized, for their tireless efforts and financial support aimed at improving communities and the life of others.

Photo Credit: www.blackenterprice.com

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Today in Black History, 8/15/2014

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• August 15, 1817 George Washington, a leading African American pioneer of the Pacific Northwest and the founder of the town of Centralia, Washington, was born in Frederick County, Virginia. The son of a formerly enslaved man and a woman of English descent, he was raised by a White couple. That couple and Washington moved to the northwest to claim land. Washington could not buy land because he was Black, therefore the couple bought the land and Washington later repaid them for the land. Washington built a home and filed a plat for the town of Centerville (now Centralia), offering lots for $10 each. By the time of Washington’s death August 26, 1905, Centralia had grown to a large and prosperous town. Today the city has a population of over 16,000 with 90% of them White and less than 1% African American. A mural depicting Washington is located in historic downtown Centralia.

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The 32nd Annual African World Festival Celebrates its “Higher Ground”

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The 32nd Annual African World Festival Celebrates its “Higher Ground”

Returns to the grounds of the Charles H. Wright Museum

of African American History in Midtown Detroit

More than 100,000 visitors mark summer with annual visits to this free, city-wide celebration of African culture. The African World Festival is for the entire community, featuring an African marketplace with more than 150 vendors of imports, visual arts, hand crafts, apparel & accessories, foods and more.

The festival is Friday, August 15, through Sunday, August 17, from 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. each day at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, 315 E. Warren Ave. Detroit, Michigan 48202. The wide variety of festival stages and activity areas includes portions of the Museum’s interior spaces. Museum exhibitions are free with Museum admission and there are extended Museum hours during the festival: 9 am - 7 pm Friday through Sunday. Festival grounds also include the Museum’s exterior grounds and nearby Peck Park, at Brush and Frederick streets.

Paid parking is available for $5 in the DIA lot, assessable off of John R., just north of E. Warren; for $7 with credit/debit card only at the Wayne State University parking structure on E. Warren, just east of Woodward; or for $10 cash only at WSU Lot 57, John R at Hancock.

WORLD-586

FRIDAY, AUGUST 15

  • Opening Ceremony – 4 pm

Museum officials, Detroit City Council members and cultural activist Joann Watson welcome the Legendary Kim Weston, soul singer and activist, with her renowned rendition of the Black National Anthem, “Lift Every Voice and Sing”                                                                                                                                                                                    

  • African Drums and Dance – 7 pm
  • Neo-Soul artist Cody ChesnuTT – 9 pm | www.cchesnutt.com
  • Lady Champagne & The Motor City Blues Crew 7pm

SATURDAY, AUGUST 16

  • Parade of Nations beginning from Peck Park at Brush and Frederick streets – 11am
  • Grammy Award-winners, Karen Clark Sheard/The Clark Sisters, along with Kierra

Sheard, and Greater Emmanuel Institutional Church of God in Christ’s Mass Choir & Dancers headline a soul-stirring program of word & music, hosted by Bishop J. Drew Sheard 6-8p

clark-sisters

  • Kuumba Artist Village – Sculpture, art and paint works created 11a-11p
  • For The Love of Literacy Children's Book Fair 10a-6p in the Latimer Café sponsored by the Knight Foundation
  • Detroit Rocks the Runway - Fashion gets cultured at the hottest runway show in Detroit! Trending designs, innovations in hair & headgear. Music, dance & drums. Don’t miss! 9-11pm

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17

  • Forum: Water - Information sharing and discussions on this hot-button topic hosted by the People's Water Board Coalition, working with Universidad Sin Fronteras, University Without Borders.
  1. oGM Theater 11a-2p
  2. oPeck Park at Brush and Frederick streets 3-4p
  • Film - Bob Marley: Spiritual Journey GM Theatre 5:30-7:30p

THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE WEEKEND:

  • Marketplace with textiles, imports, books, apparel, fine art & prints, jewelry, music & films, bath & body products, food & drink, "Tastes of the Diaspora"
  • African Folk Life Village presented by The Heritage Works
  • Elder Village with seating, water and snacks for those over age 60
  • Quilt Exhibit Masterful handcrafted quilts by textile artists in the Great Lakes African American Quilt Network, on display in the beautiful Museum Ford Freedom Rotunda
  • The Legacy of Africans & African Americans In Agriculture – dialogue series, including careers and food justice, presented by FoodPLUS|Detroit and MSU Vice President's Office of Governmental Affairs
  • Detroit Association of Black Storytellers
  • Dance & Drums interaction and performance
  • Soccer & Martial Arts demos
  • "Liberation Film Series" in the Museum’s GM Theater
  • Natural hair and head-wrapping demonstrations
  • Nile River Jazz & Blues stage
  • “Good Times” Thelma—BerNadette Stanis with a book signing. All day Friday - Sunday.

bernNadette Stanis in Detroit at The Wright

 

  • Watoto Children’s Village – Festival of Fun for our Youth: Stage performances, games, prizes and “make & take” fun for children and families. Saturday & Sunday noon – 8 p.m.

The African World Festival is made possible by the support of the Ford Motor Company and the Knight Foundation. Event sponsors also include: Heritage Works, Greater Emmanuel Institutional C.O.G.I.C., Food Plus Detroit, the MSU Vice President's Office of Governmental Affairs, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc., Clear Channel Radio, The Michigan Chronicle, Great Lakes African American Quilters Network, Cruisin' The D, McDonalds and The Gathering.

Ford-logo

knight-logo

For more info: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

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Black Philanthropy Month Spotlight: Alma Greer #BPM2014

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August 1st marks the beginning of Black Philanthropy Month 2014 (#BPM2014), a month-long, multimedia campaign designed to inform, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. Founded by the African Women’s Development Fund USA and proclaimed by the United Nations and Congress in August 2011, BPM was created as an annual, global celebration of giving in the U.S. and worldwide. This year’s theme is “Generosity at Home and Around the Globe.” Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for our daily profile of black philanthropists.

Alma Greer: Educator

AlmaGreer

Alma Greer described herself as a “daughter of the South.” Moving to Michigan at the age of 12, she had endured a healthy dose of racism during her childhood. The experiences from her formative years shaped her into a woman who cares not only about the progress of her people, but the education and preservation of African American History.

 In 1987, Greer was granted the opportunity, along with 11 others from Detroit, to join Dr. Asa Hilliard on an excursion to Egypt. After being influenced and moved by the eye opening realities of her history, she committed to returning to the motherland every year. Greer, a retired Detroit Public Schools principal, also committed to ensuring African American youth have the opportunity to learn about their history and culture, a component that she believes is crucial to building self-confidence and identity.

With her passion for African American history and culture, Greer found an instant attachment to the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American history, and has significantly invested in the institution’s sustainability and growth. In 2013, Greer hosted a party in the Charles H. Wright rotunda; the party served a dual purpose: to celebrate her 80th birthday and to raise funds to support the museum’s public art initiative, Shine A Light. Her friends, family and peers assisted Greer in raising over $16k on this one day alone, all proceeds donated directly to the project. More than a financial investor, Greer has established herself as a public advocate and voice for The Wright Museum.

Greer extends her philanthropic support to other local programs, such as the Highland Park Music Festival, the Highland Park Business Association, and Legacy of Literacy, Inc., with whom she sponsored a trip for students to the inauguration ceremonies of President Barack Obama.

Photo Credit: http://knightfoundation.org/media/uploads/media_images/AlmaStanding.jpg

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Today in Black History, 8/14/2014

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• August 14, 1874 Jonathan Clarkson Gibbs, minister, educator, politician and the first African American Secretary of State and Superintendent of Public Instruction of Florida, died. Gibbs was born September 28, 1821 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. In 1852, he became the third African American to graduate from Dartmouth College and the second Black man to deliver a commencement address at a college. Gibbs attended Princeton Theological Seminary from 1853 to 1854 but had to drop out due to financial constraints. He was ordained a minister in 1856 and became active in the abolitionist movement. In 1864, Gibbs moved to Charleston, South Carolina to do missionary work and open a school for recently freed Black people. In 1867, he moved to Jacksonville, Florida where he opened an academy for young people and became involved in politics. He was elected to the State Constitutional Convention in 1868 and that same year was appointed Secretary of State, a position he held until 1872. In 1873, Gibbs was appointed Superintendent of Public Instruction. He also was elected to the Tallahassee, Florida City Council in 1872. Gibbs High School and Gibbs Junior College (now part of St. Petersburg College) in St. Petersburg, Florida are named in his honor.

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The Wright Museum Hosts Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series 2014 Competition

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Bombay Sapphire Gin and the Russell and Danny Simmons’ Rush Philanthropic Art Foundation have partnered to present the Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series competition and opportunity to help an artist from the United States become the “Next Big Name in Visual Arts,” at SCOPE MIAMI BEACH in Miami Beach, Florida. The Charles H. Wright Museum is hosting the regional competition for the State of Michigan. All artists, emerging and professional, are welcome to participate. The competition is free and no purchase is required. The deadline to submit your artworks - online only - is August 16, 2014.

Visions

“Visions” by Lobyn Harrison. Harrison was the winner of the Detroit Regional Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series 2013. He went to Miami where his phenomenal work was exhibited to wide acclaim! You can view his piece in the Past Exhibits on the Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series 2014 website.

The Competition
The Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series provides a means of selecting some of the nation’s best artists and sending them to the internationally acclaimed Scope Miami Beach international art show. Jurors will select semi-finalists from the Michigan regional works. These artists will have their pieces unveiled in an exhibition at tThe Wright Museum in November - December 2014. One regional finalist will make the trip to SCOPE MIAMI BEACH for the grand finale event.

There, the top three pieces will earn a spot in the BOMBAY SAPPHIRE Artisan Series Mural Project in their local market while the Grand Finale Winner will get a solo show of their own at SCOPE NEW YORK in March 2015. 

For official contest rules and how to enter, click here to visit the BOMBAY SAPPHIRE Artisan Series website.

The Opportunity
While many artists are invited to the SCOPE MIAMI BEACH, many, many more never get a chance to participate on this extraordinary world stage. The Bombay Sapphire Artisan Series serves as a feeder to this astounding event. One of Michigan’s artists will win—it could be you, but you must enter the competition. The deadline is August 16, 2014, but we want the entries to be in by August 15th. Also, our objective is to have more artist entries than the other regions, including Chicago and New York. Click on past winners at to see the Michigan regional winner.

As a special service to the Michigan arts community, the Wright Museum will help anyone who does not have access to the Internet to complete their online application and upload images of their work. Artists must have photographs of their work. For additional information or computer assistance, please contact Jennifer Evans at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or by telephone at (313) 494-5818.

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Black Philanthropy Month Spotlight: Deloris Jordan #BPM2014

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August 1st marks the beginning of Black Philanthropy Month 2014 (#BPM2014), a month-long, multimedia campaign designed to inform, inspire and invest in Black philanthropic leadership. Founded by the African Women’s Development Fund USA and proclaimed by the United Nations and Congress in August 2011, BPM was created as an annual, global celebration of giving in the U.S. and worldwide. This year’s theme is “Generosity at Home and Around the Globe.” Follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram for our daily profile of black philanthropists.

DelorisJordan

Deloris Jordan: Author, Philanthropist, and Motivational Speaker.

Deloris Jordan, also known as the mother of National Basketball Association (NBA) legend Michael Jordan, has a long history of philanthropy.  She has a history of local philanthropy in the United States and her home city of Chicago, mainly working through the James R. Jordan Foundation, which she founded and named after her late husband.  Amongst many other philanthropic efforts, Mrs. Jordan was a main contributor of a collaborative effort that created a new facility for the Nairobi Women and Children’s Hospital in Nairobi, Kenya.  Deloris Jordan has authored a number of books, most of which were in collaboration with her daughter, Roslyn M. Jordan, especially inspirational books for young children, all of which feature art by African-American illustrators.

Image credit: www.michaeljordan.pl

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