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Current & Upcoming Exhibitions

All exhibitions are free with museum admission

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And Still We Rise: Our Journey Through African American History and Culture

Permanent Exhibition

This unique, long-term exhibition serves as the central experience of The Wright Museum. The 22,000 square-foot exhibition space contains more than 20 galleries that allow patrons to travel over time and across geographic boundaries. The journey begins in Africa, the cradle of human life.  Witness several ancient and early modern civilizations that evolved on the continent.  Cross the Atlantic Ocean, experience the tragedy of the middle passage and encounter those... Click here to read more »


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Inspiring Minds: African Americans in Science and Technology

Permanent Exhibition

This comprehensive, high-tech exhibition highlights trailblazers, contemporaries and careers in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. African Americans have contributed to the scientific and engineering output of the United States since the 17th century, and this history is brought to life through interactive computer kiosks, a touchscreen video wall, and hands-on activities and play areas teaching basic engineering concepts. Four disciplines of scientific advancement are explored: Physical Sciences, Earth Sciences, Life Sciences, and Technology & Engineering... Click here to read more »


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A Theatre of Color: Costume Design for the Black Theatre by Myrna Colley-Lee

July 20, 2014 - January 4, 2015

Curated by Shirley Reiff Howarth, A Theatre of Color: Costume Design for the Black Theatre by Myrna Colley-Lee consists of more than 100 original costume designs, and over 80 production photographs, including full scale production images from several productions portraying the black experience from before World War II through the Pulitzer Prize-winning works of August Wilson.... Click here to read more »


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The Nataki Way: 35th Anniversary of the Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit

November 8, 2014 - April 19, 2015

Carmen and George N'Namdi founded the Nataki Talibah Schoolhouse of Detroit (NTSD) as a private school in 1978 to honor the memory of their fourteen-month-old daughter, Nataki Talibah N'Namdi, who died in 1974. The names Nataki and Talibah are from central Africa. Nataki (Nah-TAH-kee) means of high birth and Talibah (Tah-LEE-bah) means seeker after knowledge. Thus the school's name is both an important tribute as well as an expression of aspiration... Click here to read more »


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Ingrid Saunders Jones: 31 Years of Distinguished Service... and Counting

August 9, 2013 - January 4, 2015

Join the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in celebrating the amazing career and achievements of Detroit native Ingrid Saunders Jones, who retired in June 2013 as the Senior Vice President of Global Community Connections for The Coca-Cola Company and Chair of The Coca-Cola Foundation after 31 years of service. This limited-engagement exhibit honors her life as she moves on to its next chapter - as the volunteer national chair of the National Council of Negro Women... Click here to read more »


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Raz Baaba Aaron Ibn Pori Pitts: Portraits of a Revolutionary Artist

September 11 - January 4, 2015

This exhibition honors Detroit native Raz Baaba Aaron Ibn Pori Pitts, a visual and performance artist who creates powerful works of art in several genres including drawings, collages, and prints. He is well known for his collages which incorporate layers of color, juxtapositions of photographs, African symbols, and his special form of writing that reveals strong messages about the love of family and community, strength of character, the need for freedom and justice for all people, and the importance of honoring our ancestors on whose shoulders we stand... Click here to read more »


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A is for Africa

Ongoing Exhibition

Twenty-six interactive stations make up a three-dimensional "dictionary" designed for children from pre-school through fourth grade in A is for Africa. Organized by the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History, this long-term installation introduces young visitors to an array of interesting persons, places, events, ideas, foods and objects important to understanding the histories and cultures of Africa. While focusing on young children, those who are older will certainly find this activity enjoyable... Click here to read more »


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Ring of Genealogy

Ongoing Exhibition

Located on the floor of the Ford Freedom Rotunda, is Genealogy, a work designed by artist Hubert Massey. The creation depicts the struggles of African Americans in this country. Each figure is symbolic of an experience, from slavery to present day violence, the hunger for knowledge, the importance of spirituality and the upward mobility of African Americans. Surrounding this 37-foot floor are bronze nameplates of prominent African Americans in history. Each year new names are added to this Ring of Genealogy... Click here to read more »


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Stories in Stained Glass: The Art of Samuel A. Hodge

Ongoing Exhibition

The works of art included in this long-term installation focus on three areas of African American culture and history. The Musicians celebrates everyday people who have exercised their right to interpret the world as they see it through songs and instruments. Dance and Dancers on the other hand, honors those artists who use their bodies as the medium to express non-verbal emotions, themes and ideas. And Freedom Advocates is dedicated to notable African Americans who fought and died to ensure dignity and freedom for themselves and their people... Click here to read more »


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Detroit Performs!

Ongoing Exhibition

The museum is pleased to present Detroit Performs!, a photomontage dedicated to those who gained national and often international prominence in the performing arts. Although a majority of these artists moved here from other regions, especially the south, they claimed Detroit as their own, usually crediting it as the place where they honed their skills. Many of these innovators, John Lee Hooker, Tommy Flanagan and Mattie Moss Clark among them, put unique spins on existing art forms such as blues, jazz and gospel... Click here to read more »

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